Saturday, November 7, 2015

Like A Movie Actor Whose Onscreen Decisions Do Not Impact The Real Lives Of The Movie Going Audience, Obama's Keystone Pipeline Rejection Does Not Affect Canadian Oil Imports Into The US Or Decrease Carbon Output

From The Washington Post, "Obama rejects Keystone XL project, citing U.S. climate leadership" by Juliet Eilperin and Steven Mufson:
Rail transport has expanded to carry oil sands to the United States, soaring from just 16,000 barrels in 2010 to 51.2 million barrels in 2014 before dropping somewhat this year. But rail transport is more expensive than pipeline transport. And the extra cost looms larger in light of current oil prices, which are about half what they were for much of the past six years.

Yet the final rejection of the Keystone XL project was widely expected in the oil industry, and many companies have already made other plans. U.S. imports of oil from Canada hit a record high of 3.4 million barrels a day in August, up from just under 2 million barrels a day in 2008, the year the pipeline was proposed. That has happened even as U.S. domestic oil production has risen by more than half and despite delays in Keystone XL. [Emphasis added.]
From The New York Times, "Citing Climate Change, Obama Rejects Construction of Keystone XL Oil Pipeline" by Coral Davenport:
But numerous State Department reviews concluded that construction of the pipeline would have little impact on whether that type of oil was burned, because it was already being extracted and moving to market via rail and existing pipelines. [Emphasis added.]

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